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Monthly Archives: February 2014

New Temporary Foreign Worker Rules “an Impediment to Business”

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Posted Date: January 13, 2014

Stephen Green says there should be more transparency from government on compliance inspections.
Stephen Green says there should be more transparency from government on compliance inspections.

Inspections without warrants and further delays to Labour Market Opinions make recent changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker program bad for Canadian business, say immigration lawyers.

On Dec. 31, a new set of amendments came into force regarding the Temporary Foreign Worker Program and employers who wish to apply for a LMO. These changes take place through amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and a new set of ministerial instructions by the Minister of Employment and Social Development Canada.
The changes include:
• As of Dec. 31, 2013, employers must complete a new LMO application form with modified questions and attestations.
• No LMOs will be issued under the authority of the Minister of Employment and Social Development Canada to employers who regularly offer striptease, erotic dance, escort services, or erotic massages. (The idea here is to protect foreign workers from abuse or exploitation.)
• Employers will be required to keep any document that relates to compliance with conditions of the IRPR for six years, starting from the first day of employment the work permit is issued to the foreign worker. Employers must also demonstrate information they provided in an LMO application was accurate;
• Employers are required to make “reasonable efforts” to ensure a workplace is free of abuse; and
• Employers must hire, train, or make “reasonable efforts” to hire or train Canadians or permanent residents if this is one factor that led to a work permit being issued.
Service Canada and the Minister of Employment and Social Development Canada will also have the authority to administer inspections. This is different from an employer compliance review that takes place in the assessment of an application made for an
LMO.
Verifying compliance will give Service Canada and the minister the power to: • Request employers provide documents that may demonstrate compliance with conditions; • Conduct inspections on-site without a warrant and interview Canadian employees and foreign workers by consent.
Following a determination of non-compliance, employers will be deemed ineligible to hire foreign workers for two years, have their name, address, and period of ineligibility published on a public ban list, and be issued negative LMOs on any pending LMO applications. They may also have previously issued LMOs revoked.
While some of the changes are acknowledged as positive for protecting vulnerable employees, some immigration lawyers say there needs to be more risk management applied to the process or it will pose a “big impediment to business.”
“If you look at the new LMO form, they are asking corporate Canada to tick off the box indicating they are not involved in exotic dancers and strippers,” says Stephen Green of Green Spiegel LLP. “That’s the best way of describing it — there hasn’t been enough risk management built into this process yet.”
Companies are going to have to be more diligent about LMOs overall. For example, if employers decide to pay a foreign worker more money than originally advertised and they don’t get a new LMO, they could be considered non-compliant.
“It’s increasingly becoming more and more difficult for employers to make these applications,” says Lainie Appleby, a partner with Guberman Garson Immigration Lawyers. “The time frames are becoming more lengthy and if a company is involved in one of either a compliance review or inspection it puts the pending application on hold. It’s going to affect Canada’s reputation and ability to compete in the global marketplace.”
Companies considering a merger or acquisition should pay close attention to the amendments, especially when dealing with franchises says Green.
“If you buy a business that has temporary foreign workers, you as a purchaser — or if merging with another company — have to make sure the vendor has been compliant all along because it will now flow to you. I’m not sure how many corporate lawyers would think that is one of the undertakings you would need to ask for under this legislation,” says Green.
“For example, Tim Hortons Inc. stores in Alberta use many temporary foreign workers. If you were to buy a Tim Hortons using temporary foreign workers and the owner wasn’t compliant and you can’t get work permits for two years, you’re done.”
Green calls the new regime that allows for inspections without a warrant “ridiculous” and says there should be more of a risk-management approach by the government as to who is being targeted for inspection.
“They have more powers than the police in that respect,” he says. “There needs to be more flexibility in the system for the local officers to make decisions. If you’re the CEO of a company and you’re here on a work permit and you’ve been here for two years, you have to go through the whole advertising and recruitment process again — it doesn’t make sense from a business standpoint,” he says.
He says the compliance reviews triggered by a request for a LMO also need to be shorter — some have been going on since May with no decision issued. There also needs to be a system for employers with urgent needs for workers.
“You would think from a transparency perspective you would like to get a report on the compliance review but you don’t — you just get the report you asked for,” he says. “There’s not enough transparency given to the employer to help them be better employers.”
Appleby says she is getting calls from clients concerned about how this will affect filling senior positions.
“I have some clients who are recruiters and they keep calling with every job assignment they get — and this is C-suite recruiting, senior managerial jobs — often for publicly traded companies. Not only is it not anyone’s business how much they make but that will have possible ramifications on stock prices,” she says.
Under the previous regime, with high-level occupations an employer did have to show the wages met up with what was required by the government but they didn’t have to post it in the ad.
“When you’re advertising at that level it is certainly not the industry standard to include the wage,” says Appleby.

Summit tackles MD employment issues, seeks national response

Canada’s major medical organizations have committed to ongoing efforts to solve the unemployment and underemployment problems facing some newly trained physicians, particularly in hospital-based specialties such as orthopedic surgery.

The commitment was contained in a joint statement issued following the National Physician Employment Summit, a mid-February gathering in Ottawa that attracted more than 100 representatives from medical organizations and governments. The meeting, organized by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, did not produce any specific commitments for short-term change, but there was strong support for creating a pan-Canadian strategy to match physician numbers with population needs.

It also produced a commitment to have the Royal College coordinate and collect all relevant information regarding specialty-specific data, and for delegates to meet again in the fall to exchange best practices and coordinate efforts.

Attendees also urged continued funding for the Physician Resource Planning Task Force, a group supported by the federal/provincial/territorial Committee on Health Workforce that is working to determine the right number, mix and distribution of physicians required to meet society’s needs.

The joint statement said physician unemployment and underemployment are complex issues with numerous root causes, including limited planning capabilities and data on population needs.

“In an era of lengthy wait times and budget limitations, our health system needs to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of all health professionals,” it said. “This commitment is a vital first step toward ensuring that Canada always has the right number of physicians practising in the right areas, supported by the necessary health care resources to meet patients’ needs.”

The summit was prompted in part by new Royal College research documenting the pervasive nature of the employment issues in some medical and surgical specialties.

In the summit’s opening address, Brigadier-General Jean-Robert Bernier, surgeon general and commander of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group, documented the Forces’ success in meeting the health needs of a variety of populations around the globe, often under trying conditions. He said it would be an “inexcusable tragedy” if Canada could not work successfully to plan for future health care needs and the physician distribution required to meet those needs.

Prior to the meeting, Danielle Fréchette, meeting co-chair and director of health policy and external relations for the Royal College, said that “the summit’s not meant to try and fix the problem for the doctors, it’s really about how can we come together to serve the needs of the public.”

CMA President Louis Hugo Francescutti said the deliberations will be considered successful if they ultimately result in creation of a healthier Canadian population.

The joint statement was made on behalf of the Steering Committee of National Physician Employment Summit, a group created by the CMA, Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, Canadian Nurses Association, Canadian Association of Internes and Residents, College of Family Physicians of Canada, Canadian Orthopaedic Residents Association, Canadian Urological Association, Fédération des médecins résidents du Québec, Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada and the Royal College.

by Pat Rich

Febuary 25, 2014

Canada’s major medical organizations have committed to ongoing efforts to solve the unemployment and underemployment problems facing some newly trained physicians, particularly in hospital-based specialties such as orthopedic surgery.

The commitment was contained in a joint statement issued following the National Physician Employment Summit, a mid-February gathering in Ottawa that attracted more than 100 representatives from medical organizations and governments. The meeting, organized by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, did not produce any specific commitments for short-term change, but there was strong support for creating a pan-Canadian strategy to match physician numbers with population needs.

It also produced a commitment to have the Royal College coordinate and collect all relevant information regarding specialty-specific data, and for delegates to meet again in the fall to exchange best practices and coordinate efforts.

Attendees also urged continued funding for the Physician Resource Planning Task Force, a group supported by the federal/provincial/territorial Committee on Health Workforce that is working to determine the right number, mix and distribution of physicians required to meet society’s needs.

The joint statement said physician unemployment and underemployment are complex issues with numerous root causes, including limited planning capabilities and data on population needs.

“In an era of lengthy wait times and budget limitations, our health system needs to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of all health professionals,” it said. “This commitment is a vital first step toward ensuring that Canada always has the right number of physicians practising in the right areas, supported by the necessary health care resources to meet patients’ needs.”

The summit was prompted in part by new Royal College research documenting the pervasive nature of the employment issues in some medical and surgical specialties.

In the summit’s opening address, Brigadier-General Jean-Robert Bernier, surgeon general and commander of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group, documented the Forces’ success in meeting the health needs of a variety of populations around the globe, often under trying conditions. He said it would be an “inexcusable tragedy” if Canada could not work successfully to plan for future health care needs and the physician distribution required to meet those needs.

Prior to the meeting, Danielle Fréchette, meeting co-chair and director of health policy and external relations for the Royal College, said that “the summit’s not meant to try and fix the problem for the doctors, it’s really about how can we come together to serve the needs of the public.”

CMA President Louis Hugo Francescutti said the deliberations will be considered successful if they ultimately result in creation of a healthier Canadian population.

The joint statement was made on behalf of the Steering Committee of National Physician Employment Summit, a group created by the CMA, Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, Canadian Nurses Association, Canadian Association of Internes and Residents, College of Family Physicians of Canada, Canadian Orthopaedic Residents Association, Canadian Urological Association, Fédération des médecins résidents du Québec, Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada and the Royal College.

by Pat Rich

Febuary 25, 2014

Canada’s major medical organizations have committed to ongoing efforts to solve the unemployment and underemployment problems facing some newly trained physicians, particularly in hospital-based specialties such as orthopedic surgery.

The commitment was contained in a joint statement issued following the National Physician Employment Summit, a mid-February gathering in Ottawa that attracted more than 100 representatives from medical organizations and governments. The meeting, organized by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, did not produce any specific commitments for short-term change, but there was strong support for creating a pan-Canadian strategy to match physician numbers with population needs.

It also produced a commitment to have the Royal College coordinate and collect all relevant information regarding specialty-specific data, and for delegates to meet again in the fall to exchange best practices and coordinate efforts.

Attendees also urged continued funding for the Physician Resource Planning Task Force, a group supported by the federal/provincial/territorial Committee on Health Workforce that is working to determine the right number, mix and distribution of physicians required to meet society’s needs.

The joint statement said physician unemployment and underemployment are complex issues with numerous root causes, including limited planning capabilities and data on population needs.

“In an era of lengthy wait times and budget limitations, our health system needs to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of all health professionals,” it said. “This commitment is a vital first step toward ensuring that Canada always has the right number of physicians practising in the right areas, supported by the necessary health care resources to meet patients’ needs.”

The summit was prompted in part by new Royal College research documenting the pervasive nature of the employment issues in some medical and surgical specialties.

In the summit’s opening address, Brigadier-General Jean-Robert Bernier, surgeon general and commander of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group, documented the Forces’ success in meeting the health needs of a variety of populations around the globe, often under trying conditions. He said it would be an “inexcusable tragedy” if Canada could not work successfully to plan for future health care needs and the physician distribution required to meet those needs.

Prior to the meeting, Danielle Fréchette, meeting co-chair and director of health policy and external relations for the Royal College, said that “the summit’s not meant to try and fix the problem for the doctors, it’s really about how can we come together to serve the needs of the public.”

CMA President Louis Hugo Francescutti said the deliberations will be considered successful if they ultimately result in creation of a healthier Canadian population.

The joint statement was made on behalf of the Steering Committee of National Physician Employment Summit, a group created by the CMA, Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, Canadian Nurses Association, Canadian Association of Internes and Residents, College of Family Physicians of Canada, Canadian Orthopaedic Residents Association, Canadian Urological Association, Fédération des médecins résidents du Québec, Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada and the Royal College.

By Pat Rich

Forward any comments about this article to: cmanews@cma.ca.

More doctors without jobs as Canadians face long wait times

Published: February 17, 2014, 4:32 pm

OTTAWA — More than 100 stakeholders in the medical profession are gathering in Ottawa this week to discuss a paradoxical issue affecting health care in Canada: a growing number of doctors without jobs.

The National Summit on Physician Employment, to be held Tuesday and Wednesday, was organized by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in response to a study it released last fall that found 16 per cent of specialist physicians are unable to find work in Canada.

The college’s Danielle Frechette, who organized the summit, said the phenomenon of unemployed or underemployed physicians is particularly vexing as Canadians continue to face long wait times for medical procedures.

“I keep declaring a conflict of interest in this research: I waited over a year for a new hip so I’m really keen to find solutions for all of us,” she told Postmedia News on Monday. “I am not sure that we’re really organizing our resources as optimally as we could so that we could find work for everyone and shorten wait times.”

In fact, a glut of doctors is not among factors cited in the report for the employment challenges facing young specialists, Frechette said.

Rather, a primary culprit is poor economic performance that has affected both investment in hospital resources such as operating rooms and the retirement portfolios of older physicians who are staying in the workforce longer.

The move towards interprofessional models of care — which increase reliance on other health care providers in place of doctors — and inadequate career counselling for medical students about where and what available work there is were also factors.

Chief among the goals at the summit, which is to be attended by representatives of medical, educational and government entities, will be to uncover any remaining causes for employment challenges and to start the ball rolling toward establishing a national strategy to direct health-care professionals in the future, Frechette said.

“We really need a pan-Canadian approach to address the health-care workforce in Canada.”

Right now, medical faculties exist in eight provinces and intake into programs is based on regional needs. But there is growing acknowledgment among the medical field that that practice ignores the preeminent reality of today’s economy: “The workforce moves,” Frechette said.

And there are already fears of a “brain drain” spurred by young doctors choosing to leave Canada in search of work.

Models for a national approach to health-care workers exist in both the United Kingdom and Australia, which is a good case study for Canada because it is also a confederation, she added. Summit delegates will be examining those models as they begin the long process of brainstorming a solution that will benefit all Canadians.

“The summit’s not to try to fix the problem for the doctors, it’s really about how can we come together to serve the needs of the public.”

Jbarrett@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/jm_barrett

 

Quebec’s ‘dying with dignity’ law would set new standards

Bill 52 follows European, not U.S. models for end of life, unbearable suffering criteria

By Janet Davison, CBC News Posted: Feb 17, 2014 5:00 AM ET

Should Quebec’s national assembly pass — as early as this week — the proposed legislation to allow medical aid in dying, it will be setting in place a law that appears to take much of its key inspiration from Europe.

While a small number of North American jurisdictions, such as the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon and Vermont, have laws allowing physician-assisted suicide, Quebec’s proposed Bill 52 follows Europe’s lead in particular by extending the law’s reach to those experiencing “unbearable suffering,” but who may not be within months of dying, which is the U.S. criterion.

A Quebec legislative committee on “dying with dignity” visited Europe, and made many references in its 2012 report to experiences, particularly in Belgium and the Netherlands, where there have been laws like this for more than a decade.

That report recommended that doctors be allowed to help terminally ill patients die, in exceptional circumstances and with prescribed safeguards, if that is what they wish.

Bill 52, which passed second reading in the Quebec legislature in October by a vote of 84-26, looks “very much to have been inspired by similar legislation in Europe, especially in the Netherlands and Belgium and Luxembourg, who have more or less the same end-of-life laws in place,” says Wayne Sumner, an emeritus professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto.

“What makes [Bill 52] more similar is that, first of all, it legalizes both physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia.”

The difference between those two actions, Sumner says, lies in what the physician and patient do. In a physician-assisted suicide, the patient takes the final step of self-administering the fatal medication; in voluntary euthanasia, the doctor administers it, perhaps via injection or an IV, at the patient’s direct request.

In Oregon, Washington and Vermont, only physician-assisted suicide is legal, not euthanasia.

QUEBEC EUTHANASIA 20130612Veronique Hivon, Quebec’s minister for social services and youth protection, has been leading the Bill 52 initiative, which would allow medical aid in dying. (Jacques Boissinot/Canadian Press)

​The other significant similarity between Bill 52 and the European laws lies, Sumner suggests, in the main indicator for requesting medical aid in dying: “an incurable disease, an incurable illness, which is causing unbearable suffering.”

“The patient must be experiencing suffering which he or she regards as intolerable or unbearable and can’t be relieved by any other means which the patient finds acceptable,” Sumner says.

Different criteria in U.S.

“In the U.S. cases, the criterion is quite different. There’s no requirement of patient suffering. The only requirement is that the patient have a terminal illness, an incurable and terminal illness, where terminal means that death is expected within six months.”

Bill 52 underwent a review, and during that process an amendment was added that Sumner says moves the proposed legislation a little closer to the American model.

The amendment to section 26 of the bill says that a patient must “be at the end of life,” along with five other criteria, to obtain medical aid in dying.

‘It’s left open and vague.’– Wayne Sumner

The proposed Quebec bill, however, doesn’t offer any further definition of what “at the end of life” means, a situation that sets up the potential for legal debate.

“It’s left vague and open,” says Sumner. “There’s no similar provision in the European cases, which makes euthanasia available to patients who otherwise satisfy the conditions, but who might have actually a long time to live and who just decide that their quality of life isn’t worthwhile.”

In Belgium last year, that country’s law was the focus of renewed debate when twin 45-year-old brothers who were deaf and going blind sought help from a doctor to end their lives. Critics have argued that the existing legislation didn’t cover their circumstances.

In a news release from the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Jocelyn Downie, a professor in the faculty of law and medicine atDalhousie University in Halifax, describes that “end of life” amendment to Quebec’s Bill 52 as “significant.”

Whether it is significant enough to influence other jurisdictions and the Supreme Court of Canada, however, may be a different story. In 1993, the Supreme Court narrowly (5-4) imposed a ban on physician-assisted deaths in the case involving a B.C. woman, Sue Rodriguez. In 2010, theHouse of Commons also voted down, by a wide margin, a proposal to allow for assisted deaths.

Last month, however, the Supreme Court decided to re-open the issue, on an appeal from another B.C. case. And most observers believe it would almost certainly take up the Quebec bill, too, at some point, should it be passed.

Who’s at end of life?

In the same release from the CMAJ, Dr. Catherine Ferrier, a geriatric physician and president of the Physicians’ Alliance for Total Refusal of Euthanasia, says that this new amendment is not specific enough because it does not spell out what it means to be at the end of life.

“Half my geriatric patients could be considered at the end of life. I understand it’s difficult to define, but it’s a central axis of the whole bill and it’s a weakness that they have not defined it,” Ferrier says.

“This bill is written by people who don’t understand medicine. Under the current criteria anyone could ask for euthanasia.”

‘They’re very clear it’s competent adults only.’– Udo Schuklenk

If the law passes in Quebec, Sumner expects it would be subject to a lot of interpretation on the question of what “at the end of life” means.

He lays out a scenario that might be possible in the Netherlands or Belgium, but might not in Quebec, involving a person who has had a catastrophic accident and became a quadriplegic.

In the example he gives, this person lives with the condition for a few years, and then decides he just doesn’t want to carry on any longer.

“In the Netherlands, if they were to request euthanasia, that request could well be granted on the ground that they are finding the suffering attended by their condition, which is incurable, to be intolerable or unbearable. But … under any reasonable definition, they’re not at the end of life,” says Sumner.

“How that would go in Quebec remains an open question. There may be cases like that that Bill 52 is intended to prevent.”

Udo Schuklenk, a philosophy professor who holds the Ontario research chair in bioethics at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., suspects that this “at the end of life” addition could also be meant to exclude people with clinical depressions.

If so, he suggests, that move would be “in sync very much with the majority of Canadians who, in opinion poll after opinion poll, support assistance in dying but really only for terminally ill patients.”

Not for children

If there are similarities between Quebec’s Bill 52 and the European laws, there are also differences.

Last week, Belgian lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to extend the country’s euthanasia law to children under 18, something that is not part of the Bill 52 proposal. It says a patient must be “of full age and capable of giving consent to care.”

 

Belgium Child EuthanasiaThe electronic voting board shows the result of the vote on Feb. 13, 2014, by members of Belgium’s federal parliament on a bill on child euthanasia (Yves Logghe/Associated Press)

“They’re very clear it’s competent adults only” who would be able to call on the law, says Schuklenk.

The Belgian law empowers children with terminal ailments and who are in great pain to ask to be put to death by their doctor if their parents agree and a psychiatrist or psychologist certifies they are conscious of what their choice signifies.

It had wide public support, but was opposed by some pediatricians and the country’s Roman Catholic clergy.

The Belgian vote, Sumner says, brings that country’s law “more or less in line” with the law passed in the Netherlands in 2002, which extended the law to children as young as 12.

To Sumner, there’s no surprise in Quebec taking inspiration from Belgium or the Netherlands.

“You would normally expect Quebec to look to France, but France has not legalized any form of medical aid in dying,” he says.

“Belgium is closely related … the next closest francophone or semi-francophone country in Europe and the only one that has a law on which they could model Bill 52.”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/quebec-s-dying-with-dignity-law-would-set-new-standards-1.2537259

Opinion: Shoddy Canadian research is putting women’s lives at risk

Regular mammography screenings detect cancer, despite what flawed study reported…

BY PAULA GORDON, SPECIAL TO THE VANCOUVER SUN FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Regular screening mammograms find cancers earlier and save lives. For many women, this is conventional wisdom, as well it should be; every credible scientific study supports screening.

All, that is, except one, a poorly designed, poorly executed Canadian study that was completed decades ago using out-dated mammography machines and corrupted methodology that cannot be justified.

Yet, despite being widely discredited, the Canadian National Breast Screening Study haunts us still. Every few years, and again this week, the study’s authors republish their findings and announce screening does not save lives. Too many newspapers spread that misinformation without criticism, even though almost no one who reads mammograms or treats women with breast cancer has ever taken the Canadian study seriously.

Women should do what the World Health Organization did more than two decades ago, and ignore its conclusions.

The Canadian study’s flaws have been well documented since it began. Most egregiously, the study was not blindly randomized. Women who volunteered to participate were examined by an experienced doctor or nurse before they were assigned to either the control group (which did not receive mammograms) or the group that was screened. If you were one of those doctors or nurses, and you felt a lump in a woman’s breast that might be cancer, and lumps in her armpit that might be lymph nodes to which the cancer had already spread, would you let her be assigned to the group that wouldn’t be screened?

The study’s authors deny that this took place, but one study co-ordinator was fired for doing just that. The study showed no difference in mortality between the two groups, since more women who already had breast cancer were assigned to the mammogram group in the first place.

The study’s integrity only deteriorated from there. A significant percentage of women in the control group — the one that was not supposed to have mammograms — had themselves screened anyway, outside the study, contaminating the results.

The quality of the mammography in the trial was poor. As a breast radiologist in Vancouver, I know the mammography equipment used at the study’s Vancouver site was not state-of-the-art; even in the 1980s, when the study was conducted, it was already 10 years old. Many of the technologists who performed the mammograms across Canada were not properly trained on how to position the woman to include as much breast tissue as possible, so some cancers that should have been detected on the mammogram were missed.

The study’s authors are now asking women to make decisions on whether to have a mammogram based on a flawed study that not only relied on poor research methods, but that also used obsolete technology that was designed before many women in their 40s today were born.

Including data from the Canadian study in their analyses, task forces in both Canada and the United States have now recommended against screening for younger women. They weighed what they considered the harms and benefits of screening. The harms include the anxiety of being recalled for more tests, even when cancer is ultimately not diagnosed, and over-diagnosis, the identification and treatment of cancers that may never have proved to be fatal.

In the majority of cases, the anxiety is short-lived. The questions that mammograms raise are nearly always answered by a few more pictures, or ultrasound. A small number of women will need a needle biopsy, a procedure that, as one of my patients told me, “is less uncomfortable than some of her shoes.” A woman’s choice is between the possibility of a minimally invasive procedure to rule out cancer and not being screened.

A doctor planning a move to Canada? Planning to hire a foreign doctor? BEWARE!!!

Employers recruiting foreign physicians are finding that ignorance of changing Canadian government regulations can be a very costly mistake – and a heartbreaker for foreign doctors and their families…. 

The increasing complexity associated with the pathways that foreign physicians
must follow to legally start work in Canada is now littered with veritable
regulatory landmines.

Stringent government regulation now dictates to potential employers where they
must post employment ads, how many ads they must post, what wording must be
contained in the ads, and how long the ads must be posted.

Many private medical clinic owners and provincial health regions have already
waited weeks for permission from the Government of Canada to recruit a much
needed physician – only to receive an official letter bluntly stating that
permission to recruit has been denied due to an incomplete technicality.

In one instance, the employer of a hopeful foreign physician made mistakes on a
Service Canada application – on three different occasions! These errors led to
more than eight weeks of delays, and during the interim a qualified Canadian
applied for the same job, bumping the unlucky foreign physician out of his job.

Another foreign physician actually came and worked in Canada for three months
before Immigration Canada found an inadvertent error by his employer on his
work permit, resulting in the immediate cancellation of the permit – which sent
the physician scrambling back to the UK to get back to work.

To avoid these types of costly and heartbreaking events, CanAm highly
recommends that any Canadian employer or foreign physician considering opening
a career pathway into Canada,– should do their research and invest in a
reputable, up to date and professional recruitment firm with a proven track
record in international and domestic medical recruitment.

CanAm Physician Recruiting still has the pulse of the physician recruitment
market, and remains the first choice to guide Canadian employers, physicians
and their families in their quest for new careers world-wide. To get the most
up to date information about the Canadian and international physician
recruitment market go to – www.canamrecruiting.com to speak with a CanAm
professional – NOW!

To see new and exciting physician job opportunities across Canada, the USA, the
Caribbean, New Zealand and the Middle East – click here – https://www.canamrecruiting.com/JobListings.php
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Comments? We encourage you to send your feedback and comments to the Editor at phil@canamrecruiting.ca.