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Monthly Archives: June 2018

Dido Harding, NHS Improvement: “I’m shocked at the lack of basic people management skills in the UK’s NHS” | The BMJ

Better leadership training in the NHS would increase staff engagement and tackle bullying, the chair of the NHS trust regulator tells Tom Moberly Since she joined watchdog NHS Improvement as chair in October 2017, Dido Harding has been struck by the ways in which the health service falls short in the treatment of its staff. “I am quite shocked at the lack of some of the basics of people management that I would expect to see,” she says. “That’s not to say that there are not pockets of complete brilliance—of course. there are. I’ve seen examples of some of the best people management and leadership I’ve ever seen. But it is unbelievably inconsistent.” Harding joined NHS Improvement, which regulates NHS trusts in England, after a string of senior jobs in the private sector, most recently as chief executive of telecoms company Talk Talk. Speaking at the Health Foundation annual event in London on 22 May, she says that, coming into the NHS as an outsider, she can’t get her head around the prevalence of bullying among health service staff. “It’s awful,” she says. “The percentage of staff saying that they have been a victim of or have witnessed bullying is three, four, fivefold more than you would see in other organisations.” The high levels of bullying seen in the health service arise, she believes, from shortcomings in management skills across the NHS. “I suspect it’s a real indication of an immaturity in the whole system in what good management looks like,” she says. “Good management isn’t soft and fluffy—good …

Source: Dido Harding, NHS Improvement: “I’m shocked at the lack of basic people management skills in the NHS” | The BMJ

Studying heart disease after death can help the living | EurekAlert! Science News

Autopsy findings provide valuable information about causes and natural history of overall cardiovascular disease. Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis.

Source: Studying heart disease after death can help the living | EurekAlert! Science News

Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine use | EurekAlert! Science News

The use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths. In addition to providing an explanation to bereaved parents, it can help the understand whether a recurrence in future pregnancies is likely.

Source: Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine use | EurekAlert! Science News